The Benefits of Breast Thermography

By Joyce Sobotta

Breast thermography offers the opportunity to detect breast disease earlier than has been possible through breast self-examination, doctor examination, or mammography alone. Breast thermography offers women a valuable imaging tool they can add to their regular breast health check-ups beginning with baseline imaging at age twenty.

Cancer cells can be found in our bodies anywhere. Why do they grow and develop in some people and not in others? It’s an accumulation of factors. All disease grows in an acidic, congested environment. Mental, emotional, and physical stress all contribute to an unhealthy immune system. Stress acidifies the body and contributes to shallow breathing and low oxygen in the body. To help eliminate mind and body stress, take time to rest, exercise, meditate, be grateful, and get quality sleep every day.

Popular Screening Methods
Three popular screening methods aimed at early detection for breast cancer are:

Mammogram – A mammogram uses radiation to detect the internal anatomical structure of the breast and can miss 40-50 percent of breast cancers in women with dense breasts.

Breast Ultrasound – This method uses sound waves to create a picture of the tissues inside the breast. It can show all areas of the breast, including the area closest to the chest wall, which is hard to study with a mammogram. An ultrasound is often used to check abnormal results from a thermogram or mammogram.

Breast Thermography – This digital infrared picture reveals heat and vascular patterns of breast tissue. These patterns change when a breast tumor starts to grow. Breast-cancer cells require new blood vessels to feed them nutrients and oxygen. They grow in abnormal patterns, and they generate increased heat that is detectable by thermography.

A thermography scan can detect subtle physiological changes whether it is cancer, fibrocystic disease, an infection, or vascular disease. It can be used as a tool to monitor breast health and can show a reduction in vascular activity with simple dietary changes, lymphatic breast self-massage, exercise, and stress reduction at all levels. For women who don’t wish to have mammograms, it’s a great option.

Thermography, with its ability to assess risk and monitor breast health, leads to perhaps the most important point that’s never mentioned, which is that breast cancer risk is largely modifiable. Only 10-15 percent of breast cancer cases have any genetic component, which means that 85-90 percent of risk has to do with other factors … diet, stress, and environmental factors being among the most important. A recent study published by the American Journal of Radiology concluded that thermography could help prevent most unnecessary breast biopsies.

Women Do Have a Choice
Dr. Thomas Hudson, a physician, radiologist, and breast imaging specialist, says pseudo-cancers, “cancers that would not cause harm during a lifetime,” tend to get treated through aggressive means such as repeated mammography scans, undue biopsies, and often double-breast mastectomies. Out of fear, and without more information, too many women choose these options. Dr. Hudson says what a person eats, along with how she feels and thinks, affects her health more than one might expect. There are simple, reasonable steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer or to improve chances of recovery if there is already a diagnosis.

For more information, including a FREE PDF of “The Nine Steps to Natural Breast Health,” visit Joyce Sobotta’s website AromaTherapyNaturesWay.com.

Joyce Sobotta is founder/owner of an international business renowned for Healthy Girls Breast Oil — a unique essential oil blend for breast health. Joyce offers consultations, webinars, and presentations to empower women with knowledge and preventive action to free them from the fear of breast cancer. Joyce creates her own formulations using 100 percent pure, authentic essential oils.

Natural Heritage Project: Art Giving Voice to At-Risk Species

by Jessica Turtle, Creative Director for Farm Table Foundation

There’s a dynamic list that is a small part of an international response to gather data on the location and status of rare species and natural communities: insects, snakes, turtles, bees, and other natural features. This list, “The Wisconsin Natural Heritage Working List (WNHWL),” is over twenty pages long: in six-point font it provides Latin names, common names, rank, and status of over 1,200 species in Wisconsin. Have you seen the list?
For example, the species are ranked according to their degree of risk: S1, critically imperiled; S2, imperiled, high risk of extinction or elimination; S3, vulnerable. The water shrew, the satiny willow, the slender bush clover, and the prairie leafhopper are all S2s and S3s that live right here in Wisconsin. The rusty patch bumble bee ranks as an S1.

A group of artists rallied by the discovery of the WNHWL began chipping away, one species at a time, to create a work of art for each. They will not stop until every last species identified has a voice, or even better still, is represented by a well considered, articulate visual work of art. The artist group is named The Natural Heritage Project.

The project, sponsored by Farm Table Foundation in downtown Amery, Wisconsin, held the first exhibit [When?], entitled “Much Ado About Bees,” focusing on six declining bumblebee species and the popular culture of the ever-producing honey bee.

The exhibit included honey bees as a way to connect people with something beloved and familiar, then encouraged further dialog through the artistic imagery that had been created regarding the native species of bumblebees that are disappearing. The exhibit displayed each of the seven species, depicted by myself, in a series of methodical and vibrant paintings, a hand-woven sun hive made by artist Kelsey Bee of Minneapolis, and bee boxes hand painted by Christy Schwartz of St. Paul in the likeness of famous works of art. Also on display were beekeepers’ tools, a sample table with fourteen varieties of local honey, and beekeepers’ clothing. Guests were invited to enjoy a Wisconsin/Minnesota—made mead (honey wine) tasting.

The next Natural Heritage Project exhibit, entitled “Inopia,” by Saint Paul artist Sarah Nelson, has been created after months of delicate consideration. Sarah chose her species from the WNHWL based on the relationship one species has to another. She demonstrates the interconnection of humans to birds, insects, fish, crustaceans, reptiles, amphibians, flies, and rodents. Sarah’s consideration, drive, and technical mastery make up the essence behind The Natural Heritage Project. Join us to celebrate our current exhibit!

Farm Table Foundation—110 Keller Avenue North, Amery, Wisconsin.
Opening Reception: November 10, 2017, 6:00 to 9:00 pm.
Exhibit runs November 10, 2017 through January 30, 2018.

Jessica Turtle a professional artist, exhibit curator, and instructor. Her current position is Creative Director at Farm Table Foundation in Amery, Wisconsin. She holds interest in food-system education, arts outreach, pollinator conservation, and watershed education—more specifically, where all these points intercept.

To learn more about the Natural Heritage Project, visit www.naturalheritageproject.org.
To inquire about hosting an exhibition, email naturalheritageproject@gmail.com.
To view The Wisconsin Natural Heritage Working List, go to http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/nhi/wlist.html.

What’s in that Pet Food Anyway?

By Margaret Meier Jones, Animal Wellness Center of Buffalo County

If you’ve watched TV lately, you’ve likely seen a commercial advertising a dog food that is “New or Improved.” Or perhaps you’ve seen a blog or a news report through social media that states a particular food was the demise of a friend of a friend’s dog. The latest and greatest today seems to be that every manufacturer seems to have a “grain-free” food that you should rush out and buy. Is this really important or just the latest, greatest marketing strategy?
Dogs, like people, are omnivores, which means their metabolism is based on meat, fruits, and vegetables; whereas cats are truly carnivores and need a diet based primarily on meat. So those commercials showing how your cat is dreaming of carrots and tomatoes aren’t actually based on biological facts. And, perhaps your cat actually does love tomatoes, but your sister’s cat only wants sardines. Why is that, exactly? One of the best answers may come from the Chinese “archetypes” of personalities and metabolisms based on the five seasons, a system that can be applied to our pets as well as ourselves. The Web That Has No Weaver, by Ted J. Kaptchuk, O.M.D., is a great book to read if you’d like more detailed information on diet and the Chinese theory of the five seasons.

So, does my pet actually need to eat “grain free”? Like many questions, the answer to this one is it depends. In general, however, grains are not typically the villains they are made out to be. The quality of the food and how much it is processed should always play a major role in determining if we should feed it to our pets rather than whether or not it contains any grain. Unfortunately the pet food industry is not as regulated as it is for humans, and pet foods aren’t even required to be balanced and nutritious to be sold to the consumer.
So, how do I navigate the world of pet foods? I strongly recommend that you compare the food you are feeding your dog to others on the market at dogfoodadvisor.com. This website uses the familiar “5 star” rating system to rank foods based on the following seven criteria according to their website:

1. No controversial chemical preservatives
2. No anonymous meat ingredients
3. No artificial coloring agents
4. No generic animal fats
5. Substantial amounts of meat-based protein
6. Fat to protein ratio of 75 percent or lower
7. Modest carbohydrate content

Notice that they refer to it as carbohydrate content, not grain free. The most common misconception I hear from my clients is that grain free equals carbohydrate free, which is far from true. Unfortunately, sometimes the grain-free version of a food can be much higher in carbohydrates than any other ingredient, which leads to weight gain and health issues related to obesity. So, check dogfoodadvisor.com, and while you’re there, be certain to register for the free food recall alerts. This way you’ll know what food you feed your pets is not only the best, but also the safest out there!

One, Two, Three Orchards: Local Apples Galore!

For most people, keeping one orchard going strong would be challenge enough. But Ron Knutson (aka Ronnie Appleseed) has his hands full currently caring for not one, not two, but three orchards. Halverson’s Orchard was the first. “Around 2009/2010, my wife’s (Shelly) Aunt Kay knew the Halversons, and Dennis Halverson was needing help with pruning, so we met and reached an agreement: we would prune the trees in exchange for some apples,” Ronnie explains. “In 2016 Dennis, who had cancer, passed away, and the family graciously turned over the management to us.  Also, in 2015, we heard at the Wisconsin Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Growers Conference that Class Apple was looking for somebody to manage it. A small 1.5-acre pick-your-own orchard was just what we wanted. We made inquiries about the orchard and contacted Lorretta. She had lost her husband, Dale, the year prior, also to cancer, and with the family living out of town, she needed someone to take care of it. So we took that on as well.”

Their third (original) orchard is AVEnue Orchard. Ronnie notes, “We purchased what was formerly known as The Apple Tree Inn Bed and Breakfast in October of 2007 but didn’t move in until January 31, 2008, after General Billy Mitchell Air Reserve Base, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, closed, and I retired. Instead of a bed-and-breakfast, we are an adult family home. I was going to retire and just do a little woodworking, primarily making flag cases, but the great outdoors called me, the trees were crying for help, and a new adventure was born. WE HAVE AN ORCHARD! So we added 1,500 more trees and two more small orchards.”

AVEnue Orchard sells jarred and canned goods, as well as prepicked apples. “I think we have as many varieties of jams, jellies, fruit butters, sauces, and pie filling as we do apple varieties, which is at twenty-six and counting,” Ronnie laughs. “And we are always dreaming up new recipes. This year’s leader in our jarred and canned goods is our Strawberry Rhubarb, followed closely by Chai Apple Butter, and who would have guessed but gaining fast is our new Apple Watermelon.  Strawberry Jam, Strawberry Hobenaro, and Apple Pie Jelly are neck-and-neck and close behind.”

What kinds of apples does AVEnue Orchard offer? This year there will be twenty-six varieties available:

Chestnut Crab
Connell Red
Cortland
Daybreak Fuji
Duchess
Empire
Grimes Golden
Haralred
Haralson
Honey Crisp
Honey Gold
Jonamac
Liberty
McIntosh
Northwest Greening
Paula Red
Prairie Spy
Red Delicious
Regent
Snow Sweet
State Fair
Sweet 16
Whitney Crab
Wolf River
Yellow Transparent
Zestar

Our pears are:
Bartlett
D’Anjou

Available for pick-your-own at Class Apple, are Honey Crisp, Cortland, McIntosh, Connell Red, Empire, and Honey Golds. “At Class Apple, we have cider, our very own blend from our very own apples. Class Apple is a quiet place to come and enjoy the greatness of God’s country,” Ronnie says. “Bring your picnic baskets along, you ain’t gonna wanna leaf,” he jokes.

AVEnue Orchard generally opens around mid-August. Class Apple opens September 9 and is open Saturdays and Sundays 12:00 to 5:00 pm, and will close October 8. Halverson’s is not open to the public.

Ronnie seeks to promote access to and use of local food products. “I love it. As much as possible, all our products are from local sources. It is a well-deserved and an awesome show of support to the local farmers, who work hard at bringing you a quality product. Besides, it always tastes better when it ripens on the vine.”

“Oh,” he hastens to add. “I forgot honey! We have honey. Yes, we have the bees here. Fascinating creatures they are.”

Mike’s Star Market: Local Meats Equal Good Eats

In business since 1990/1991, Mike’s Star Market in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, offers beef, lean pork sausage and brats, as well as handmade condiments and custom spice mixes. All their beef is hormone free, and they also offer some grass-fed beef. They have hormone-free chicken and local lamb too.
The “Mike” in Mike’s Star Market is Mike Maier.

“I actually got into the meat business because I needed a job in the late fall of 1987. My grandfather was working for a guy that was looking for help with venison processing, cutting, and wrapping. I gave it a try. My grandmother first taught me how to wrap steak and ground venison. Then after a bit, my grandfather taught me how to cut. Being a farm kid, I already knew a little about it, just not how to do cuts. I for some reason picked it up quickly. Then after that first season I was kept on part-time to cut and learn how to make some sausage items. I came back in the fall to take over my grandfather’s spot as he moved to Arizona. I cut and learned more cutting and then sausage making from Jan, who owned the shop.”

Of the various meat markets in the area, Maier feels his stands out, primarily due to the great employees. He notes, “It is not just a Mike thing, it takes others to help.” Another thing that makes the market stand out is a desire to always learn more and to strive to make already good products better. Maier notes that their products undergo only minimal processing. He adds, “We also, like other small businesses, care about our customers. Being in business this long, many customers can be called friends.”

Mike’s Star Market provides meat to some local businesses, and they also have a retail counter and freezers. Maier says, “You can stop in and buy what you like or order in large amounts. Not much we can’t do or offer. If we can’t do it, we know other meat shops in the area that can, and we will point you in that direction.”

What is important to Maier and his staff is to provide good meat to customers. “I want you to be satisfied with first quality and flavor,” he says. “Because we make sausage here, we can control the quality. We try to hold ourselves to a higher standard and offer a good price for what the consumer buys or wants—which is always changing.”

Mike’s Star Market also offers venison processing, from cutting the whole deer to making a very wide variety of sausage items. They offer custom smoking of most anything, excluding fish. They can do custom cut animals for farmers who bring them in or have them butchered on the farm or another facility. As Mike says, “Not much we can’t or won’t do, meat related.”